Pupil Premium Statement

Pupil Premium Statement

 Mission Statement

Their minds and their futures are entrusted in our hands for a few brief years of childhood.  We must do all in our power to serve them well

Pugh, C. 1996 Contemporary Issues in the Early Years

Rationale

The pupil premium is additional funding for publicly funded schools in England to raise the attainment of disadvantaged pupils and close the gap between them and their peers.

https://www.gov.uk/pupil-premium-information-for-schools-and-alternative-provision-settings

Background

Pupil premium funding is allocated in local authority maintained and non-maintained schools to children from low income families who are known to be eligible for free school meals (FSM); children who have been eligible for free school meals anytime in the last six years (called Ever6 FSM); those children in local authority care and children whose parents are serving in the armed forces.

Schools are able to consider how they will spend the Pupil Premium funding, with that focus on narrowing and ultimately closing the achievement gap. Schools are held accountable as to how the funding has been spent ad the impact the funding has had. 

To ensure transparency, Ashbrow School publishes information online as to how the Pupil Premium funding has been spent and the impact of the previous year’s funding.

Mobility

Ashbrow School increased the PAN and there has been considerable mobility across all year groups throughout the year:

 2014-15 Overview:

Year Group

No. of Children

In year Inward

Movement

In year Outward

Movement

Pupil Churn

Year 1

60

3

5

13%

Year 2

57

5

5

18%

Year 3

50

10

9

38%

Year 4

57

14

6

35%

Year 5

38

3

4

18%

Year 6

37

4

2

16%

2015- 16 Overview:

Year Group

No. of Children September 15

No. of Children July 16

In year Inward

Movement

In year Outward

Movement

Pupil Churn

Year 1

58

59

6

5

19%

Year 2

60

59

3

4

12%

Year 3

55

54

5

6

20%

Year 4

51

49

2

4

12%

Year 5

57

52

2

7

16%

Year 6

37

36

3

4

19%

 Numbers of Pupils Eligible for Pupil Premium Grant

Number of pupils on roll during Summer 2 2015: 413

Percentage of pupils eligible for Ever 6 FSM: 56.2%

Year Group

No. of Children

No. of Pupil Premium

No. of non-Pupil Premium

Year 1

60

32

28

Year 2

57

32

25

Year 3

50

31

19

Year 4

57

37

20

Year 5

38

22

16

Year 6

37

28

9

 Number of pupils on roll during Summer 2 2016: 423

Percentage of pupils eligible for Ever 6 FSM: 58%

Year Group

No. of Children

No. of Pupil Premium

No. of non-Pupil Premium

Year 1

58

24

34

Year 2

60

28

32

Year 3

55

33

22

Year 4

51

26

25

Year 5

57

34

23

Year 6

37

23

14

2014-2015-2016 Pupil Premium Impact

The table below illustrated the average point score (APS) progress for children eligible for pupil premium during the previous academic year and the prior year. The expected average points score per year is 8 points progress.

Year Group

Focus Area

Pupil Premium children

Average Points Progress

14-15

Pupil Premium children

Average Points Progress

15-16

All Children Average Points Progress

15-16

2

Reading

5.2

10.35

10.6

Writing

4.8

8.70

8.1

Mathematics

5.3

9.61

8.5

 

 

 

 

 

6

Reading

4.2

10.2

9.8

Writing

9.8

9.6

9.8

Mathematics

3.6

10.9

11.0

  Years 1, 3, 4 and 5.

This is the second year of the changed assessment process for years 1, 3, 4 and 5 based on the new National Curriculum. There is one comparison with the previous year. Children are expected to make 8 points progress across the year. The table below illustrates the point progress for children in receipt of pupil premium.

Year Group

Focus Area

Pupil Premium children

Average Points Progress

14-15

Pupil Premium children

Average Points Progress

15-16

All Children Average Points Progress

15-16

 

 

 

 

1

Reading

5.2

8.5

8.5

Writing

4.9

8.4

8.2

Mathematics

7.7

8.7

8.0

 

 

 

 

 

3

Reading

6.6

10.0

9.8

Writing

8.2

10.3

10.1

Mathematics

8.0

9.2

9.4

 

 

 

4

Reading

11.3

8.2

8.4

Writing

9.7

9.2

9.3

Mathematics

12.4

10.7

10.8

 

 

 

 

 

5

Reading

13.3

10.5

10.6

Writing

7.6

9.9

9.8

Mathematics

12.3

9.5

9.5

 

 

 

 

 

Pupil Premium: Allocation for 2015-16

Budget allocation: £241,800          

Based on eligible pupils in October 2015: Ever6FSM 188  

 CLA 1       

Service children allocation 2

Strategy

Cost

Impact / Actions

Staffing:

Ashbrow curriculum:

Before school support for Breakfast Clubs.

Before school support for sport clubs KS2.

Bee-keeper and gardener’s time.

Activity support workers for lunchtime KS1 and 2.

20% of £260,040

 £52,008

 

An average of 100 pupil premium children are benefitting from regularly attending breakfast club in KS1 and 40 in KS2 which is helping readiness to learn.

Beekeeping, hen keeping and tending the garden motivate our learners to enrich the curriculum and impact on attendance which in turn will impact on Standards.

Focus of a wide variety of lunchtime clubs for targeted children supports afternoon learning.

The PASS (pupil attitude to school survey) data for October 2015 creates a positive picture and staff are working with specific pupils as needed.

 

 Teaching staff:

Providing one small class in year 6 through procuring 0.8FTE teacher.

 

10% of £260,040

 £26,004

 

83% of pupil premium children in the year 6 small class supported by an experienced teacher with a focus on basic skills in English and mathematics (Success at Arithmetic).

 

Support staff:

Four learning mentors and experienced INco to support and nurture those children who are of social, mental and emotional health concern (SMEH).

20% of £260,040

 £52,008

 

Support for children identified by staff and other agencies to have SMEH issues (50% pupil premium) through encouraging engagement with school, monitoring of behaviour and support to deal with where possible. Measured through behaviour logs, reduction in exclusions and Readiness to Learn profile.

 

 Attendance:

Learning mentor time allocated to reduce unauthorised and persistent attendance. Rigorous checking of unauthorised non-attendance, links with L.A., home visits etc.

 

 5% of £260,040

 

£14,002

 

 

Links with LA officer will reduce persistent attendance, families in distress have clear link person. Daily telephone calls and follow up home visits take place as needed.

Strategy

Cost

Impact / Actions

Intervention for reading:

Better Reading Support Partnership run by seven skilled ETAs and The Code group intervention run by two support staff. Librarian support to widen reading choices. Books purchased on children’s interests.

 

14% of £260,040

 £36,400

 Children identified by teaching staff as needing further support with either decoding or comprehension to boost towards age related expectations. Measured through the Salford Sentence Reading Test for BRSP and Phonics and Early Reading Assessment for The Code. Children understanding a wider range of text types and developing own interests.

 

Intervention for reading and writing:

Early Literacy Support run by an experienced ETA.

 

3% of £260,040

£7,800

Children identified by teaching staff as needed further support with phonics and early writing to provide short term boost towards age related expectations.

Intervention for mathematics:

First Class Number (KS2) led by an ETA, begins Spring 2016.

 

 1% of £260,040

 

£2,600

 

Focus on building mathematical skills for identified group of children in year 3. Measured by the Sandwell Numeracy assessment.

 Extended School support:

Homework Club offered to all children weekly with support from class based ETAs and specialist provision staff, team led by INCo.

 

 10% of £260,040

 £26,004

 

Parents welcomed to sessions, link for home learning and ambition. Children supported to complete homework by familiar staff and to enjoy other class base related activities.

 Support for the more able:

Targeted literacy support through increased ETA staffing across school (Spring term).

 

 10% of £260,040

 £26,004

Children will be identified through identified through assessments. Up levelling of work will be managed through planned success criteria and deeper questioning (Blooms Taxonomy)

Staff training:

LA consultant support for writing. Training half day session January 2016, two accompanied writing moderations December 2015 and March 2016. All staff to attend.

 

 1% of £260,040

 £2,600

 

 

 All staff to receive training looking at constructing a short narrative and encouraging writing stamina.

Two writing moderations LA consultant to be accompanied by literacy lead and deputy head teacher.

Strategy

Cost

Impact / Actions

Resources

 

Online maths booster session for 16 children in year 6, begins January 2016.

 

 

 1.5% of £260,040

 £3,250

 

One to one personalised maths tuition studying the National Curriculum topic at child’s own pace to narrow the gap between disadvantaged and others.

GL assessment complete digital solution purchase included standardised and diagnostic assessments.

 

2% of £260,040

£5,200

 

 Diagnostic assessments indicate areas of concern and offer solutions. Standardised assessments offer individual reports to devise personalised learning element to support teacher’s planning and resourcing.

Continued purchase of ‘My Maths’ online mathematics teaching and support programme.

 

0.1% of £260,040

 £260

 

 Teachers will have access to a range of on-line resources. Children will be able to use the programme at home and build links with parents who have raised concerns over supporting their children with mathematics. Measured through mathematics data across school.

 

£10,000 contingency